Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Get out the violins...

Last time, over the 11 days in the village I managed to:

Fall down in the waterfall, getting completely soaked and perhaps bruising the bones in my hand (I still couldn’t lean on it 10 days later)

Slip into a rock and tear off part of my toenail (see lovely picture later!)

Fall into the corner of a shelf

Burn my hand with hot tea

Fall backwards off a ladder into a house

Get attacked by a fierce palm, with hooks in the leaves

Do a spectacular comic-book style slip on a papaya peel, resulting in my first grazed knee since I was about 10.


I’m sure I’m already known as the doctor who is always hurting herself. It’s nothing new; I think it’s my usual clumsiness mixed with a different environment. I’m rather proud that I managed to avoid going through a bamboo floor!

5 comments:

smw said...

Well - we knew you may be exposed to some dangers but didn't realise it would be this difficult ...!! Hope all your wounds are starting to heal and that you will not encounter any similar problems in the coming weeks. We are back home after an interesting trip, I did manage to do a rather spectacular head-first dive after tripping on the board walk at the Dove Lake walk near Cradle Mtn, but only suffered a lump on the head and a bruised knee - who said it was hereditary?? Love Mum & Col

Anonymous said...

Hi Mel, it's good to see that you're prepared to go to some lengths to fully identify with the ailing and failing, Your Mother's flight into the unknown can only really be described as potentially I.C.UISH, however I can now understand the medical value of chocolate; remember, wine heals all wounds, Col

Anonymous said...

Hi Mel, it's good to see that you're prepared to go to some lengths to fully identify with the ailing and failing, Your Mother's flight into the unknown can only really be described as potentially I.C.UISH, however I can now understand the medical value of chocolate; remember, wine heals all wounds, Col

deetee said...

Great to speak with you on the phone last night. The irony of you going to the Dawn Service at Hellfire Pass, knowing your Grandpa entered Thailand as a POW on Anzac Day in 1943, and also knowing that you're most likely retracing his footsteps on the infamous Burma Railway, is both amazing and sobering. As Paulo Coelho says in "The Alchemist", there are no such things as coincidences. The modern day parallels with the treatment of the Karenni are scary.
Your painful encounter with the centipede adds another to your list of woes. Sorry for passing on the clutz gene - you can blame me.
Love Dad

melt said...

so it appears that both my parents take responsibility for my clumsiness. i got a double dose - or perhaps it was squared?